Monday, January 28, 2008

Crimson Cabaret

Crimson Cabaret; Celebrating Creative Women

Don't miss the event of the winter season,

North Shore Women's Center annual fundraiser on Saturday, February 2nd, 2008!

Crimson Cabaret is a rare artistic collaboration that draws together a collection of acclaimed local performers.

This engaging evening will showcase the vibrancy of the creative female spirit from Taiko drumming, vocal ensemble and theatrical comedy to aerial performance, singer songwriters and a variety of stunning folk and modern dance.

An outstanding silent auction begins at 5 pm. Items include: original art, handcrafted jewelery, adventure trips, holistic healing, a lover's basket, hair and make-up products, a booklover's collection, a golf package, restaurant vouchers, a weekend getaway, and much more!

All proceeds will go toward continuing the North Shore Women's Centre's programs and services in 2008.

Saturday, January 26, 2008

Dreams for Women - Second Week...











Antigone Magazine is launching a Feminist Postcard art project and fundraiser but instead of asking what your secrets are, we want to know what your Dreams for Women are.


What are your own dreams for yourself, your friends, your sisters, your daughters? Paint, draw, write, sketch or decoupage your dreams on a postcard and send it to the address below

Antigone Magazine
C/O WILLA UBC
Box 61-6138 SUB Boulevard
Vancouver, BC, Canada
V6T 1Z1
OR


With your postcard submission, we ask that you make a donation (if you can!) to Antigone Magazine for anywhere from $1 to $10. You can send your money along with your postcard or donate on our blog: http://www.antigonemagazine.blogspot.com/ .

But don't worry... if you don't have the money, just send along the postcard and tell people about this program. We will be posting postcards every second Saturday starting in January on the blog!What is Antigone Magazine? We're a grassroots national magazine that works to encourage young women to get involved in politics in Canada. We work to empower young women to engage politically and civically and to actively take part in leadership roles.


We are raising the money in order to help launch the Antigone Foundation, a national foundation that will encourage young women aged 10-30 to get politically and civically engaged. Help support Antigone as we help to make the dreams of young women come true!We want submissions from all over the world - so forward this on! Post it on your blog! Or link to it!

Friday, January 25, 2008

Guerilla Grrls: Masked Avengers

The Guerrilla Girls: Masked Avengers!

Friday, February 1st, 7:30pm

Art Historian Barbara Tyner, MA, delivers an illustrated talk on how the Guerrilla Girls have exposed sexism, racism and corruption in art, film, politics and pop culture with facts, humour and outrageous visuals. Since 1985, the GG’s have worked collectively and anonymously to produce posters, billboards, public actions, books and other projects bringing “fake fur and feminism to new frontiers.”

Thursday, January 24, 2008

Fashionably wrong


Hillary Clinton may have lost the vote of  the fashionistas who follow Anna Wintour.

As Women's Wear Daily reports, Clinton was expected to appear in an issue of Vogue during the presidential race, but pulled out last minute over fears of sexualizing her campaign.

A Vogue spokesperson recently confirmed, "We were told by Ms. Clinton's camp that they were concerned if Clinton appeared in Vogue that she would appear too feminine."

But has this really jeopardized her chance at the White House? With the most popular woman in the world officially endorsing her competitor, Clinton may have already lost the support of the Oprah club

Hillary is expected to bare the brunt of representing the every woman. Apparently, her camp thinks its better for her to appear more like Tracy Flick in Election than Elle Woods in Legally Blonde.  

And Hillary is already being treated differently by pundits like Chris Matthews, reports Slate.com.

Would the fashion world react in the same way if Obama pulled out of a haute couture shoot? Or would they ever have expected him to appear in the first place?

Courting female voters, or any voters for that matter, is new terrain for the first female front runner in U.S. history. 

Unlike male candidates who can rely on results of campaigns gone by for advice for how to run a campaign, for Clinton, there is no precedent for addressing "women's issues" that have been thrust upon her, such as infidelity, sexuality and navigating the world of high fashion.

Wednesday, January 23, 2008

Celebration of Morgentaler Decision

Before and Beyond

Come celebrate the 20th anniversary of the historic Supreme Court decision
that finally gave Canadian women true reproductive choice!

Monday, January 28, 2008, 6-10pm

SFU Harbour Centre, 515 W. Hastings St., Vancouver

Featuring: Reception, cash bar, speaker's panel, and new documentary film
"Henry"

Here is a poster with details:
http://www.prochoiceactionnetwork-canada.org/Morgentaler-Jan-28-08-flyer.pdf

For more info, contact jharthur@shaw.ca

See you at the event!

Tuesday, January 22, 2008

Mom, can a man ever be president?

"Do you think a man could ever be president?" the little boy in Ireland asks his mother. All his life he has only seen women presidents, currently Mary McAleese."

I have to say that I love any article that starts like that! Not that I want young boys to feel like they are unable to hold political power but because it is so revolutionary to think of a place where female power is so naturalized. It also is quite indicative of how children respond to the modeling of roles and behaviors. Young women have a harder time imagining themselves in positions of power because they have few exterior models of women in those positions. I've quoted a couple of parts of the article below but you should really read the whole thing:

Joanne Sandler, deputy executive director for programmes at the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM), tells this little anecdote to show that in some places it can be routine for women to be found in leadership roles. "In places like Ireland and Finland it is becoming less extraordinary to see a woman in power," says Sandler. And it is this kind of female power that could bring more women into leadership, she says. "When you see women in positions of power, in ministries, obviously the self-image of girls changes, and they envision themselves in those places. But that kind of change will take a very long time, though it has started," she adds. The change does not necessarily correspond to a nation's level of economic development.

There is not a relationship between more money and less gender discrimination," says Sandler. "Money and power have an influence in those women achieving power. But money alone doesn't explain it. "Look at the elections in Liberia. A woman who has education, a former employee of the World Bank and the U.N., with an impressive resume, against a man who had no high school education, a soccer player (George Weah). Imagine the opposite: against a man with Johnson-Sirleaf's background, would a woman with Weah's credentials be a serious contender? To be a contender for high level political office, women have to bring a lot of extra qualities in order to get into the race. They need the same things as a man, plus others." Ayesha Kajee, former researcher at the South African Institute of International Affairs and board member of Supposedly developed societies which continue to operate under highly patriarchal and authoritarian family and leadership structures can on the other hand "institute policies that result in institutionalised and societal antipathy towards empowering women," Kajee says. "Women themselves in these societies are often tacitly complicit in the latter, because they have been socialised to think that access to power is undesirable, unfeminine or irreligious."

One of the main obstacles is the violence that women candidates face. Not only physical violence, but also how they are addressed, how they are reported on, which emanates from gender discrimination. And it is not confined to Africa." Women leaders are under a different kind of scrutiny, she says. "They are still a novelty because it is so unusual...But there is great expectation from Johnson-Sirleaf and (Chilean President Michelle) Bachelet, by women and by others. Do they receive a greater level of scrutiny than others? Is it fair?"

Monday, January 21, 2008

The Press of Trafficking

In keeping with our coverage of the phenomenon of trafficking, I direct you to this article by Simon Houpt of the Globe and Mail. My title is both a pun on the immediacy and very urgent reality of trafficking in our society, and the way in which the media helps to foster this sleeping giant (now roused).

The pervasiveness of trafficking is only too evident throughout Houpt's discussion, because as he astutely observes, even the "health & Fitness" section of New York Magazine is littered with ads for spas whose hours are outside of the normal spa customer's regime.

Houpt's article chronicle's NOW's fight to pressure the major New York magazines to eliminate their sex-industry ads--a difficult fight indeed given the millions of dollars in revenue such ads provide to the magazines.

Nonetheless, over the past months various publications have made promises to withdraw these ads:

The sex seems to be disappearing from the city.

Over the last few months, advertisements for what are euphemistically referred to as "adult services" have been vanishing from New York's weekly newspapers and glossy magazines. In August, the alternative newsweekly New York Press announced it was dropping ads for escorts, models and "classy, sensual ladies." And just three weeks ago, New York magazine marked the new year by eliminating the small but lucrative Adult category in its back-of-the-book Marketplace section.

The moves by both publications came after pressure from a local chapter of the National Organization of Women as part of a campaign to raise awareness of human trafficking. NOW says trafficking isn't just an abstract event unfolding in some ruined paradise halfway around the globe. Citing a statement by the U.S. Department of Justice that JFK Airport is a major hub for trafficking, it notes that a number of brothels busted over the last couple of years in the city had been operating on the backs of illegal immigrants smuggled into the country and kept virtually enslaved. The ads, NOW insists, are an integral part of that illegal economy.

The organization's efforts led Governor Eliot Spitzer to pass statewide anti-trafficking legislation in June, emboldening NOW to begin targeting publications around town. "We try to make them understand how [yanking the ads] doesn't have to be a bad thing," Sonia Ossorio, the president of NOW NYC, told me last week. "If you have high-end retailers like Tiffany's, they don't want to be next to Hot Asian Honeys." NOW estimates the ads were worth about half a million dollars annually to New York, and perhaps twice that to The Village Voice.

New York was initially unmoved by NOW's aesthetic and moral arguments, telling the Times in a statement: "If ever the authorities bring evidence of illegal activity behind any of our ads to our attention, we will take immediate action to remove the ad - and the advertiser - from our magazine permanently." But in early November, two days before a threatened protest by NOW's sign-wielding masses outside New York's Madison Avenue offices, the magazine pre-emptively agreed to pull all such ads by Jan. 1.

Houpt further observes that perhaps the best places to start in the fight against trafficking via advertising are ethnic newspapers:

And if human trafficking is the target, the city's ethnic newspapers might be a better place to start. One brothel busted in March, 2006, where dozens of Korean women were being kept, had been advertising in The World Journal, the largest Mandarin-language paper in the country. "We're not able to monitor it as closely as we'd like," admitted Ossorio. "We need to find people who can help us read it."


Indeed, they do need help. Regardless of the fact that the sex industry does make some women money independent of exploitation and abuse (though I think this is debatable), rescuing those women who are trapped as objects of the sex trade requires that the entire industry come under attack since clearly the institution as it is does not define the boundaries between 'object' and objective... As Ossario observes: "I'm not trying to cause them any harm. But you can't separate trafficking from the sex industry, because trafficking is a part of the sex industry." Human trafficking is our reality and it should not be ignored...

Saturday, January 19, 2008

Dreams for Women...


Dreams for Women is still a biweekly event until we get enough postcards to justify doing it every week (hint, hint: send some in!). But I did want to geive you at least something this week, as well as, to thank those people who have featured Dreams for Women on their blogs.

Particular thanks to the german blog Madchenblog... who said some very flattering things about us.

Also, to Our bodies Ourselves, who also featured the project on their blog!

Here's the Dreams for Women info for those who haven't yet heard about the program!

Antigone Magazine is launching a Feminist Postcard art project and fundraiser but instead of asking what your secrets are, we want to know what your Dreams for Women are.

What are your own dreams for yourself, your friends, your sisters, your daughters? Paint, draw, write, sketch or decoupage your dreams on a postcard and send it to the address below

Antigone Magazine
C/O WILLA UBC
Box 61-6138 SUB Boulevard
Vancouver, BC, Canada
V6T 1Z1

With your postcard submission, we ask that you make a donation (if you can!) to Antigone Magazine for anywhere from $1 to $10. You can send your money along with your postcard or donate on our blog: http://www.antigonemagazine.blogspot.com/ . But don't worry... if you don't have the money, just send along the postcard and tell people about this program. We will be posting postcards every second Saturday starting in January on the blog!

What is Antigone Magazine? We're a grassroots national magazine that works to encourage young women to get involved in politics in Canada. We work to empower young women to engage politically and civically and to actively take part in leadership roles. We are raising the money in order to help launch the Antigone Foundation, a national foundation that will encourage young women aged 10-30 to get politically and civically engaged. Help support Antigone as we help to make the dreams of young women come true!

We want submissions from all over the world - so forward this on! Post it on your blog! Or link to it!

Thursday, January 17, 2008

Why Women's & Gender Studies in High School?

I remember spending the majority of my high school career unenlightened and absorbing the information given to me without question. As I moved into post-secondary education, I was introduced to the plethora of ideas and theories that outright contradicted what I understood to be “true” or essential. For me, one of these ideas was feminism. Feminism and women’s & gender studies was one among many subjects that redefined (and still is) my definition(s) of society. Why must high school students wait until they reach college or university to become exposed to not only feminist studies but other realms of innovative thought? These ideas should not be restricted to academia but instead taught at lower levels, especially in high school where one is first encouraged to supposedly develop critical thinking instead of absorbing information like a drone.

The Miss G Project seeks to establish an interdisciplinary approach by integrating Women’s & Gender Studies into the high school curriculum. Shannon Mills, a teacher in
Ontario, recently taught a brand new Women’s Studies course at her high school:

A semester of ‘surfing the Third Wave’ of feminism alongside a diverse mix of adolescents—some timidly dipping their toes in the water, others eager to dive full force into the most challenging breakers—has served to strengthen my personal belief that a women’s studies course is essential for today’s teens. At a time when young women are bombarded with pornographic messages gone mainstream, in a society where raunch culture is cited as “the new feminism,” in a decade when even prominent feminists recognize that the women’s movement is experiencing a dangerous backlash, it is more important than ever to provide students with a curriculum which equips them with a sense of integrity, entitlement, and empowerment. (. . .)

I know all too well the frustration of attempting to establish a balanced gender perspective in the classroom, having revised my senior-level history course repeatedly over the last five years. It disappoints me to realize that the high school curriculum continues to reflect what one of my professors aptly termed the “add-women-and-stir methodology.” Women’s issues are still relegated to the sidebars of textbooks; women’s concerns continue to be presented as tangential topics within the bulk of the core curriculum. In my classroom, despite my best efforts, Michelangelo still eclipses Gentileschi, Napoleon continues to trump Wollstonecraft.

An entire semester devoted to the study of issues affecting women historically, politically, and globally gives teachers the rare chance to dig deeply into topics which the traditional curriculum only grazes. (Originally published in the OSSTF Update Vol. 33 No. 7, February 15, 2006.)

The course was received with much acclaim and praise from students. Male students also benefit from women’s studies—being a feminist doesn’t mean you have to be female. In fact, it takes a lot of courage. Perhaps if more students, female and male, have an opportunity to study Women’s Studies, they will begin to have a better understanding of the interlocking issues that encompass gender (and) politics and begin to voice their criticisms and concerns. To take an active interest in what’s happening in their communities, country and world is something we’d all like to achieve.

Tuesday, January 15, 2008

Human Trafficking in Canada... a Problem...

Think human trafficking doesn't happen in Canada? Think again. It's a problem and one that won't get any better unless we take action on it and raise awareness about it. CTV writes about the break up of the Toronto trafficking ring...

A fourth Toronto-area man has been charged with bringing foreign women to the country to work as sex slaves.

He is one of seven people charged in a human trafficking ring that has brought a number of women from Eastern Europe to Canada with fake passports.

The suspects are accused of luring women to the country under the pretext they'd be working as models in Canada.

Police allege the women were held against their will when they arrived and were told they'd be working as escorts for the ringleaders of the operation.

Their duties included performing prostitution-related activities.

Officers from Toronto and York Regional Police searched numerous residences and arrested six people from the GTA on Thursday.

Toronto resident Artur Tomchin, 35, and Richmond Hill residents Andrei Khazarov, 39, and Daniel Leshinsky, 38, face several charges.

After police made the initial arrests, they located an additional victim who gave information leading to yet another suspect.

Volha Vassilievna Venar, a 35-year-old Toronto resident, was arrested on Sunday and charged with conspiracy, human trafficking, exploitation, procuring a person to become a prostitute and living off the avails of prostitution.

Saturday, January 12, 2008

Dreams for Women - First Official Week!











Antigone Magazine is launching a Feminist Postcard art project and fundraiser but instead of asking what your secrets are, we want to know what your Dreams for Women are.

What are your own dreams for yourself, your friends, your sisters, your daughters? Paint, draw, write, sketch or decoupage your dreams on a postcard and send it to the address below


Antigone Magazine
C/O WILLA UBC
Box 61-6138 SUB Boulevard
Vancouver, BC, Canada
V6T 1Z1

With your postcard submission, we ask that you make a donation (if you can!) to Antigone Magazine for anywhere from $1 to $10. You can send your money along with your postcard or donate on our blog: http://www.antigonemagazine.blogspot.com/ .

But don't worry... if you don't have the money, just send along the postcard and tell people about this program. We will be posting postcards every second Saturday starting in January on the blog!


What is Antigone Magazine? We're a grassroots national magazine that works to encourage young women to get involved in politics in Canada. We work to empower young women to engage politically and civically and to actively take part in leadership roles. We are raising the money in order to help launch the Antigone Foundation, a national foundation that will encourage young women aged 10-30 to get politically and civically engaged. Help support Antigone as we help to make the dreams of young women come true!

We want submissions from all over the world - so forward this on! Post it on your blog! Or link to it!

Friday, January 11, 2008

Shedding a tear for media coverage

With the American presidential primary races heating up usually frosty January political coverage, some of the front runners, exhausted from months already spent campaigning, are showing signs of emotional melting.

Although they may prove to be some of the fiercest rivals in the race to the White House, Mitt Romney, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton have shared at least one very personal thing -- public tears.

So why is it that Hillary's tears -- or lack thereof -- have attracted the most attention in the media?

She is the only female front runner in the history of U.S presidential politics.

Clinton bears a disproportionate burden in her campaign. She must find a balance that no man is expected to, between showing she is "human," and not appearing too "emotional."

After a misty-eyed answer at a campaign stop in Portsmouth, New Hampshire Monday, in which her voice cracked as she described her passion for politics, headlines shouting the news that "Hillary Wept," swept the nightly news, just a day before she usurped the New Hampshire primary from the night's expected victor, Barack Obama.

Network pundits dwelled on these tears as if they had single-handedly solved the Middle East peace crisis. Bloggers specualated on whether they were real. Perhaps most alarming is that many pundits overtly ascribe Hillary's victory in New Hampshire Tuesday with her public display of emotion.

As Emily Krone points out in a Daily Herald article, "it's unclear what Clinton's show of emotion says about her or her candidacy. But the media and public frenzy surrounding the display says something very definitive about American society, and persisting stereotypes about women and leadership."

Renowned feminist Gloria Stenheim recently wrote an Op-ed in the New York Times condemning the media for the double burden they place on the only female candidate in the race.

"What worries me is that [Obama] is seen as unifying by his race while she is seen as divisive by her sex," she says.

But there are more reasons to lament the media's coverage of the race between "the black man" and "the white woman." By casting candidates in racial and gender stereotypes, the media continues to frame the campaigns in terms of essentialist notions that have nothing to do with how either candidate might govern the most powerful country in the world.

Instead, American news outlets are perpetuating a divisive type of identity politics, forcing voters to draw allegiances based on one dimensional characteristics, and in turn, perpetuating a "dumbing down" of the electorate.

Toronto Star Launches Feminst Blog!!!!


Kudos to the Toronto Star and Antonia Zerbisias. Zerbisias, a Living columnist for the Star has launched a feminist blog called Broadsides!!! That's right, a mainstream media outlet has launched a FEMINIST Blog!!!!!! They don't even try to pussyfoot around it:

Antonia Zerbisias is back to blogging. The Star's Living section columnist launches Broadsides, her fearless, funny and feminist take on the man's world where women live. Join in as she kicks butt, including her own as she also blogs about her New Year's resolution to lose 45 pounds.
Wow. Amazing. I thought I would be dead before the mainstream media began giving time and resources to cover women's issues. And I'm 23. I do sincerely hope that it was the feminist part and not the weight loss part that sold them on the issue.
Regardless, In the last few days she has done a fabulous job and covered issues as far ranging as the Hillary Teargate 2008 (insert eye roll in the direction of all the misogynist this situation has brought out of the woodwork) and the sexism on the US Campaign trail. I have already found her to be an engaging, intelligent and interesting read and I recommend that you all read her blog regularly, comment and write letters to the management to show that these kind of voices ARE IMPORTANT!!!
Because not everyone thinks so... like this one guy who writes in response to her post on how ridiculous it was that america was commenting on Chelsea Clinton's looks when she was a 13 year old in the White House:
I know that looks are a sore point for you, being unattractive, but why do you hate men so much? Is it because none of them want you? Or are you just being overly emotional? Regardless, we won't have to hear about Chelsea for much longer since no American in their right mind would want a woman in the White House.
Well, the crazies were bound to come out right? But, I just want to voice my full and complete support for Zerbisias' blog and for more blogging and print coverage of women's issues in the print media in general. So, welcome Antonia (may I call you Antonia?) and may we enjoy your blogging and commentary for many years to come.
Oh, and main stream media - if you can't find anyone to write more articles about women and especially young women... please, call me. I've got an honours degree in English and plenty of clips.

Tuesday, January 8, 2008

Hillary Clinton and Sexism...



Gloria Steinem wrote an Op-Ed in the New York Times and Hilary, Barack, Racism and Sexism and it's very interesting... and necessary for me to share it with you here.


THE woman in question became a lawyer after some years as a community organizer, married a corporate lawyer and is the mother of two little girls, ages 9 and 6. Herself the daughter of a white American mother and a black African father — in this race-conscious country, she is considered black — she served as a state legislator for eight years, and became an inspirational voice for national unity.


Be honest: Do you think this is the biography of someone who could be elected to the United States Senate? After less than one term there, do you believe she could be a viable candidate to head the most powerful nation on earth?


Gender is probably the most restricting force in American life, whether the question is who must be in the kitchen or who could be in the White House. This country is way down the list of countries electing women and, according to one study, it polarizes gender roles more than the average democracy.


If the lawyer described above had been just as charismatic but named, say, Achola Obama instead of Barack Obama, her goose would have been cooked long ago. Indeed, neither she nor Hillary Clinton could have used Mr. Obama’s public style — or Bill Clinton’s either — without being considered too emotional by Washington pundits.


I think that perceptions of competencies are indeed skewed and that gender is one of the most exclusionary factors. As the photo above shows... some lovely fellows attending a Clinton rally felt the need to remind her that women's proper place was to iron their shirts. Can we even begin to start imagining the outcry that would come if it had been a racist sign at an Obama campaign. Which is not to say that Obama has it 'easier' per se... but well... I'll defer to Steinem:





So why is the sex barrier not taken as seriously as the racial one? The reasons are as pervasive as the air we breathe: because sexism is still confused with nature as racism once was; because anything that affects males is seen as more serious than anything that affects “only” the female half of the human race; because children are still raised mostly by women (to put it mildly) so men especially tend to feel they are regressing to childhood when dealing with a powerful woman; because racism stereotyped black men as more “masculine” for so long that some white men find their presence to be masculinity-affirming (as long as there aren’t too many of them); and because there is still no “right” way to be a woman in public power without being considered a you-know-what.

But what worries me is that he is seen as unifying by his race while she is seen as divisive by her sex.

What worries me is that she is accused of “playing the gender card” when citing the old boys’ club, while he is seen as unifying by citing civil rights confrontations.

What worries me is that male Iowa voters were seen as gender-free when supporting their own, while female voters were seen as biased if they did and disloyal if they didn’t.

What worries me is that reporters ignore Mr. Obama’s dependence on the old — for instance, the frequent campaign comparisons to John F. Kennedy — while not challenging the slander that her progressive policies are part of the Washington status quo.


And these are relevant worries. If Clinton's campaign does anything, it will necessarily highlight a lot of ingrained biases that our society likes to refuse that it has.

Senator Clinton cries for the fate of America


As Hillary marches confidently (or so it seems) to the Democratic convention the media coverage is immense, allowing for opportune quips and 30-second CNN cut-aways. What Hillary provided was not the usual take-no-prisoners rational speeches about her experience and view for America; no, Hillary gave America tears. Nice, big feminine slide-aways down her cheeks, just before the New Hampshire primary that she won tonight. The moment happened when she was surrounded by other women, and as The Wall Street Journal reports of the moment:
"It's not easy, it's not easy," Clinton said shaking her head. Her eyes began to get watery as she finished answering the question, "I couldn't do it if I didn't passionately believe it was the right thing to do. This is very personal for me. I have so many ideas for this country and I just don't want to see us fall backwards. It's about our country, it's about our kids' future," she said softly crying, her voice breaking. The group of 15 women sitting around a table at the Cafe Espresso nodded understandingly. Clinton continued, her voice still cracking: "We do it each one of us because we care about our country, but some of us are right and some of us are wrong, some of us are ready and some of us are not, some of us know what we'll do on day one and some of us don't," she said.
Although many news outlets are nodding in sympathy and sighing that Hillary is, after all, a human being, this reeks more of a set-up than a candid moment. Sure, maybe this campaign is something she is passionate about and the pressure is getting to her. But on the other hand, maybe this politically savvy woman who has been accused of taking whatever position the polls indicate she should take has realized the only way she will become the first woman president is if she plays up the woman part just as much as she has the president part. Just look at the speech: she talks about what she "feels", she tries to connect to listeners through her role as a mother, and she cries.

I will not personally vote in the American elections as I am a Canadian citizen, but I watch these proceedings closely as both a curious person and a feminist. I have long admired Ms. Clinton, and wish to see a woman president of the United States. However, I wonder if that fight will be fairly won, if there can be such a thing in politics, if she gets to the White House not because she's a ball-buster, but a bawler.